Category Archives: big ideas

An inside glance at Regent Park

Toronto is full of so many amazing stories of transformation and growth. Change is never easy, but with some good practices of community engagement and bringing the right stakeholders to the table – there are opportunities to create beautiful things. … Continue reading

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Site Visit to the Corktown Common

Did you know that in a peak storm event, Toronto’s Don River could be as strong as Calgary’s Bow River during the 2013 floods? It was this realization that catalyzed the construction of Toronto’s Corktown Common. A beautiful park featuring … Continue reading

Posted in big ideas, public policy, resilience, sustainability | 1 Comment

Beyond the Salon

After a bit of radio silence, The Civic Salon is happy to announce that we’re back – in a slightly different format. In this iteration of the Salon we are going beyond the conversation to the streets of Toronto. No, … Continue reading

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Bring out your inner designer..

Designing the ideal toy using concepts of human centered design.  Gotta love it!

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The F******* Word.

It’s time to talk feminism… what’s behind this 8- letter word? We know you’re curious, so come on out and share your thoughts. Tuesday, June 25th at 7pm. Check out the Upcoming Salon for more details + sign up.

Posted in big ideas, controversy, LGBTQ, politicization, sexual abuse, shifting, social change, violence, women, youth | Leave a comment

the end of the world?

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Livin’

How should, could or does one live? The options are endless…

Posted in big ideas, collaboration, cooperation, design, development, experiment, institutions, integration, public policy | Leave a comment